NGC300 by Jason Jennings
Discovered in 1826 by James Dunlop, NGC300 is a grand spiral galaxy residing in the constellation Sculptor.
The galaxy’s diffused spiral arms are abundant with young blue stars and red-pink gaseous nebulae being heated by the stars. The nebulae form different shapes as a result of shock waves from stellar explosions.
NGC300 is one of the brightest members of the Sculptor Group of galaxies, a grouping which is closest to the Local group that includes our Milky Way galaxy. NGC300 is located approximately six million light-years away.

NGC300 by Jason Jennings

Discovered in 1826 by James Dunlop, NGC300 is a grand spiral galaxy residing in the constellation Sculptor.

The galaxy’s diffused spiral arms are abundant with young blue stars and red-pink gaseous nebulae being heated by the stars. The nebulae form different shapes as a result of shock waves from stellar explosions.

NGC300 is one of the brightest members of the Sculptor Group of galaxies, a grouping which is closest to the Local group that includes our Milky Way galaxy. NGC300 is located approximately six million light-years away.

The Sculptor Galaxy
The Sculptor galaxy is part of a cluster of galaxies visible to observers in the Southern hemisphere. It is known as a starburst galaxy for the extraordinarily strong star formation in its nucleus. This activity warms the surrounding dust clouds, causing the brilliant yellow-red glow in the center of this infrared image.

The Sculptor Galaxy

The Sculptor galaxy is part of a cluster of galaxies visible to observers in the Southern hemisphere. It is known as a starburst galaxy for the extraordinarily strong star formation in its nucleus. This activity warms the surrounding dust clouds, causing the brilliant yellow-red glow in the center of this infrared image.

Lutz Bacher, Appropriated Celestial Photographs, (2012)

M33 LRGB by Mick Hyde on Flickr.

M33 LRGB by Mick Hyde on Flickr.

Arp 87

Arp 87 is a stunning pair of interacting galaxies. Stars, gas, and dust flow from the large spiral galaxy, NGC 3808, forming an enveloping arm around its companion. The shapes of both galaxies have been distorted by their gravitational interaction. Arp 87 is located in the constellation of Leo, the Lion, approximately 300 million light-years away from Earth. Arp 87 appears in Arp’s Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies. As also seen in similar interacting galaxies, the corkscrew shape of the tidal material suggests that some stars and gas drawn from the larger galaxy have been caught in the gravitational pull of the smaller one. This image was taken in February 2007 with Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 detector.

Warped Spiral Galaxy ESO 510 -13 

Warped Spiral Galaxy ESO 510 -13 

NGC 253

NGC 253

Overlapping galaxies NGC 3314
While the two galaxies look as if they are in the midst of a collision, this is in fact a trick of perspective: the two are in chance alignment from our vantage point. Image released June 14, 2012.

Overlapping galaxies NGC 3314

While the two galaxies look as if they are in the midst of a collision, this is in fact a trick of perspective: the two are in chance alignment from our vantage point. Image released June 14, 2012.

Hubble Catches a Streak of Stars in Side-On View of Spiral Galaxy 

Hubble Catches a Streak of Stars in Side-On View of Spiral Galaxy